Your work is making a difference for someone. I know it is, because my work makes a difference too. 

You have stories in what you're doing, even if you don't yet realize it. I bet you tell your stories when you go home in the evenings, or when you're visiting with friends. If you truly don't, then why are you doing what you do?

Stories are a bridge that create a connection. In the telling, you can provide information about what you do, why you do it, the outcomes you anticipate, and the kinds of problems you can help solve.

How does a story make a difference?

What you have to say can make a difference in numerous ways:

  • Inspire ideas,
  • Spur action,
  • Provide help,
  • Incite understanding,
  • Solve problems.

These are the things I love about the work I do. What do you love about your work? That's probably one area where you're making a difference. 

Find stories to tell

Think about a time you got excited about your work. Maybe a client or customer showed appreciation for you leading them to something they needed. Maybe it's a product. Maybe it's an idea. Maybe they didn't even know they would find it helpful! 

Tell your stories

I see friends with businesses tell stories about breakthroughs with their clients every day. In fact, while I was in the middle of writing this post, one of my clients sent this in an email to me:

I didn’t even know that was do-able! You teach me something new every day.

That kind of feedback is exciting to hear, but it also tells me that I'm continuing to provide ideas and information that help, even when the client hasn't been looking for it. 

Are you thinking about the work you do in terms of how you contribute to helping others? If not, take a few minutes and write down five ways you made a difference for someone last week. It doesn't matter how big or small. You can feel good about the fact that you've helped someone else. 

And, if you're so inspired, write some content about it. (Then come let me know so I can check it out!)

Comment